Archive | April 2012

Social Media Experiment – How we made it onto the BBC!

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The Spark ‘n’ Launch blog are very proud to have been mentioned on the BBC website. While we didn’t make frontpage news, we did feature on The Apprentice TV series sub-site.

Our story – The Apprentice – Lean Startup Builds Minimum Viable Product in Two Days? – crept onto the programme’s page.

The Apprentice blog post is our second highest ranking submission. Mostly due to the referral traffic from the BBC.

The BBC network have employed BBC Buzz, a “tool that finds where on blogs, Twitter and other online communities people are discussing BBC programmes, and presents links to them on the relevant programme page.”

Links are collected via “a service which automatically trawls over 125 million blogs every few hours, and filters out any spam or inappropriate content.”

The BBC Buzz is currently our fourth biggest referral and is a pretty powerful example of how companies are using trawlers to bring relevant social media content to their sites. While the visitors may not all be interested in all the content, it has proven our most effective tool in directing visitors to our blog.

As always, we will continue to share the progress of our experimentation with social media. Stay tuned!

Our Social Media Experiment (titled “Project Trout”) measures the effectiveness of various online promotion methods. You can read more in previous postings:
Update #1
Update #2
Update #2

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You might also enjoy:
+ Social Media Experiment – Twitter, Google+ and now Facebook
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ Social Media Experiment – Twitter, Google+ and now Facebook
+ Project Trout – Social Media Experiment Update #3

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

Step 1 – Where to Begin

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It has been several months since we started our startup journey. We wanted to discover how to create something. We wanted to know how you went from an idea to a real business. This post reflects on what we have learned so far from others.

The two points that stand out the most when speaking to entrepreneurship is as follows:

1. It takes hard work and energy
2. It takes hard work and energy

The above it not a typo!

All business owners say the same things. They tell you how tough, scary and lonely it is to take a risk and start something on your own. They speak passionately about what they have achieved but don’t shy away from the ups and downs.

To us, this really means that you need to be doing something you love because building a business takes sacrifices.

So where do you begin? We feel it takes knowing who you are and what you are passionate about…

1. Interests? What are you good at? What do you enjoy?

Because starting your own business requires significant time, effort and enthusasim it seems crucial that you focus your new venture around your interests.

Ask yourself, what am I good at?

The most simple exercise is taking a piece of paper and dividing into three:

+ Very Good – What am I really good at? What are my main skills? What are my main passions?
+ Okay – What am I just ‘okay’ at doing?
+ Bad – What should I not bother doing?

Think ‘interests’ and ‘skills’.

Now study the ‘Very Good’ column.
+ What does it say about you? – Do you agree or disagree? If you disagree – start the process again.
+ Apply the 24/7 test – Would you be prepared to do these things 24 hours a day, 7 days a week?

2. Problem? Where can I help? Where can I make a difference?

Now that you have identified your key interests and skills. Think about some common problems you come across; or things you think you can improve.

Take a piece of paper and divide into three:

+ Problems – What things do I see everyday that I want to fix?
+ Pain Points – What really annoys me? What is totally inefficient?
+ Random – Whatever else is on your mind?

3. Combine 1 & 2

You should now have a pretty good picture of what you can bring to the world. And you should also know some of the things that need fixing.

Spend some time joining 1 and 2 together. If you are really good at baking muffins and cannot find tasty muffins in your area. Think about how you could join the two together. Muffin store? Online muffin recipes?

Note that this is only step 1. You should avoid jumping too far ahead and trying to settle on one single idea. The purpose of the above is to think of many ideas and match these to your interests. There is plenty more work ahead!

Tell us if these activities worked for you.

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You might also enjoy:
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ Startup Myths – I shall not be fooled again by gurus
+ The Bootstrap Challenge – Walking the Talk

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories

We are relatively new to Hacker News. We always felt this forum best catered for programmers. However after spending several hours of reading through old and new posts we were pleasantly surprised that the audience may be slightly bigger than first thought.

Yes, the majority of submissions and discussions are technology focused, but there are stories that stand out for us. These are where members share their honest and open experiences of getting their idea to the marketplace.

This week alone we found the following amazing submissions. These are truly inspiring!

1. $17k in eBook Sales (HN Link)

@jstorimer shares the success of his very own eBook. His blog post and Hacker News discussion outline important tips – including setting up a sales splash page to gauge interest BEFORE writing the book.

The blog post can be found here – 4 Months of ebook Sales (jstorimer.com).

While the eBook title “Working With Unix Processes” may not appeal to all, the niche content has found popularity in his $17k+ of sales!

2. $42k of Funding in 1 Week (HN Link)

@Scirra share their impressive crowd funding round on Kickstarter. They recommend doing sufficient homework on the process to achieve maximum results for the crowd funding process.

The story is available here – How we got over funded in just 1 week on Kickstarter.

And more information on their products at their website scirra.com.

3. 800k Unique Visitors in One Month (HN Link)

@thederek describes his milestone of reaching 800k unique views last month. An astonishing result from leveraging traffic from social media sites and writing super content with fantastic photos.

Read more here – Lessons Learned After Year One As a Startup Founder.

4. 400k Subscribers in 3 Months (HN Link)

@pud posed the question “I have 404,772 users. Now what?“.

Three months ago he started a social network for musicians called Fandalism. His goal was to build a database of every musician on the planet and give them a place to show their work and meet other musicians. He exceeded on his goal and now has the fortunate problem of deciding on where to take this venture. Good luck!

5. Full Time Salary in 4 Months (HN Link)

A contributor describes how he built his online cleaning business in 4 months.

The full story including discussions are available here – From an idea to replacing my full-time salary in 4 months. How I did it, and what’s next!

6. Want More?

There are many more stories available on Hacker News. Another great source is Reddit’s Ask Me Anything Section.

Check this link out for a summary of remarkable contributions – A (non-exhaustive) list of Redditpreneurs who have shared their experience with Entrepreneurship in r/entreprenuer, r/startup, r/askreddit, and r/iama

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You might also enjoy:
+ Lessons Learned From A Hacker News Traffic Spike
+ Startup Weekend: What to expect? How to prepare?
+ Samsung’s Pivot From Dried Fish to Smartphones
+ Project Trout – Social Media Experiment Update #3

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

Building a Minimum Viable Product (MVP) in One Day


(Source: Go Comics)

Can You Build a Minimum Viable Product (MVP) in One Day? Maybe…

We just finished listening to a Stack Exchange Podcast featuring Eric Ries (Lean Startup) as a guest. During the show Ries explained the importance of getting an idea out to the market to validate your assumptions and avoid wasting time building the wrong product.

This touches on his minimum viable product (MVP) concept that he defines as:

“That version of a new product which allows a team to collect the maximum amount of validated learning about customers with the least effort.”

Rob Kelly simplifies it even more by breaking down the individual components as follows:

Minimum – There is usually just one or two core problems that excellent products are trying to solve.
Viable – What makes a product viable? Will people use it? Will someone pay for it?
Product – Anything that generates value.

The viable component is crucial to the process. One must distinguish between Minimum Viable Product and Minimum Product.

SPVG define minimal product as the “smallest possible product that actually works”.

They go on further to remind us that this is “often a long way from minimum viable product which not only works, but is something that people actually choose to buy and use”.

One example Ries cites is GroupOn. GroupOn started as ‘The Point’ on a WordPress blog. It was only when Groupon sold its first deal—two pizzas for the price of one in October 2008 that they realised they were onto a good idea (WSJ).

They needed to put a real life product (a MVP) out into the market to discover if customers would take the bait. The customers liked it and all it took was a basic landing page and a bit of hard work.

Neil Patel describes how Dropbox “started with a boring 3 minute video for their minimum viable product. It looks like a normal product demonstration. And that’s all it is. There is no code. When they released the video online, however, their waiting list went from 5,000 people to 75,000 overnight!”

These examples show how small efforts can yield some powerful information. Information that can be used to test your hypothesis and determine where to spend your next efforts.

Ash Mauyra shares his experiences of building his own MVP. He highlights that a landing page is not enough. You need to use the MVP to drive out customer reactions and test your hypothesis (ie will customers buy this product?). It is more about learning than guessing.

This got us thinking on how you go about building your Minimum Viable Product (MVP) and if you could construct something quickly. Could you build your MVP in a day? What could you learn?

So think about adding a video to your website or building a WordPress blog to showcase your MVP. Ask your visitors for feedback and determine where you need to spend your time. Did this experiment stop you from wasting your energies on building the wrong product?

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You might also enjoy:
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ Startup Myths – I shall not be fooled again by gurus
+ The Bootstrap Challenge – Walking the Talk

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

Project Trout – Social Media Experiment Update #3

Project Trout continues measuring the effectiveness of various online promotion methods as mentioned in earlier posts (See: #1 and #2).

While we are not fixated on gaining readers we are curious to know what works and what doesn’t, and how hard it really is to establish any form of following. If you are a blogger and have some tips/suggestions then please drop us a line.

Recap:

Last month we shared our disappointment in Twitter and it’s failure to convert followers to blog visitors. We had some limited success with Stumble Upon but not enough to celebrate.

StumbleUpon: Big spike in traffic over two days from SU however traffic falls back down to normal levels.
Technorati: Registered account and application approved.
Blog: 25 posts available. About page updated. Traffic still remains low.
Twitter: 82 Tweets, 440 Following, 162 Followers

Week 11-14:

The past four weeks proved as disappointing as last month. We persevered with existing tools and signed up to some new methods.

StumbleUpon: Limited traffic being directed.
Technorati: Some traffic being directed.
Blog: 38 posts now available. About page updated. Glossary page added. Three posts hoping to attract interest:
Startup Glossary of Terms,
The Apprentice
Teaser of Upcoming Posts
Twitter: 245 Tweets, 550 Following, 200 Followers.
Difficulty in increasing followers (as new joiners offset by leavers)
Google+: Remarkably we now have one person following our page! Not liking Plus platform at all.
Google Adwords: We were the lucky recipient of a AdWords voucher. We will share the outcome of this work in a later post.
Sprouter: Signed up but have not made any activity.
Reddit: Signed up and shared some links. No traffic or interaction this month.
Digg: Signed up and shared (“dugg”) one link.
Other: Submitted two stories to Hacker News. Big one day spike in traffic but nothing afterwards. Visitors only visited linked post and nothing else.

What worked?

+ Google Adwords shows some promise but costs money.
+ Targeting niche sites works to drive short term traffic but has potential if visitors stay.
+ Traffic is low, but has increased from previous period suggesting signs of some activity.

What didn’t work?

– Twitter followers are fickle. As soon as one joins, others leave. Few/none click on links.
– Visitors to one post don’t mean they stay and/or re-vist.
– Google Plus is difficult to use.

Current Links:

WordPress: sparkNlaunch.wordpress.com/
Twitter: twitter.com/sparkNlaunch
Google+: plus.google.com/sparkNlaunch/
RSS: sparkNlaunch.wordpress.com/feed/
StumbleUpon: stumbleupon.com/stumbler/sparknlaunch
Sprouter: http://sprouter.com/sparknlaunch
Digg: digg.com/sparknlaunch

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You might also enjoy:
+ Lessons Learned From A Hacker News Traffic Spike
+ Startup Weekend: What to expect? How to prepare?
+ Social Media Experiment – Twitter, Google+ and now Facebook
+ Project Trout – Social Media Experiment Update #3

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

Friday 13th – 3 interesting facts

We wish you a productive and safe Friday the thirteenth! Here are some three quick facts about the date:

1. According to folklorists, there is no written evidence for a “Friday the 13th” superstition before the 19th century.
(Source: Wikipedia)

2. Friday the 13th occurs 3 times in 2012: January 13, April 13, July 13.
(Source: Time and Date)

3. Both Friday and the number 13 were once closely associated with capital punishment. In British tradition, Friday was the conventional day for public hangings, and there were supposedly 13 steps leading up to the noose.
(Source: HowStuffWorks)

If you like dates and numbers you can always check our these two earlier posts:

April Fools Day – Some of Our Favourites
Leap Year – 3 interesting facts about 29 February
It’s a numbers game – 11/11/11 @ 11:11:11

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You might also enjoy:
+ April Fools Day – Some of Our Favourites
+ Friday 13th – 3 interesting facts
+ Happy New Years – Bring on 2012!
+ It’s a numbers game – 11/11/11 @ 11:11:11

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

Startup Is Not The Same As A New Start Business

Scott Allison (@Scott_Allison), a new contributor to Forbes states in a recent article titled Startup Success: Throw Away Your Business Books “that a startup is not the same as a new start business”.

He differentiates between the two by writing:

A startup business – lacks a repeatable and scalable business model and lacks certainty.

A traditional business – proven many times before so you can take advantage of that information, research and learning which has been perfected, potentially over hundreds of years.

If you are not doing something new, then it is not a startup! You cannot apply all traditional business concepts before launching your startup product, primarily due to the level of uncertainty and the many unknowns.

This raises some interesting challenges to a startup, embarking on creating something totally new….

What existing tools and techniques are available? What path can be followed? How do you know if you are going down the right track?

This uncertainty explains the popularity in the Lean Startup movement and the scientific method to building a startup from the idea to launch. A good summary of the lean approach can be found on the Smallbiztrends website.

It states that “a startup must be agile and operate in a constant feedback loop”. This is in contrast to the traditional ‘linear’ progression of a traditional business.

Are you operating a traditional business or a startup business? Are you applying a traditional or lean approach to launching your idea?

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You might also enjoy:
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ Startup Myths – I shall not be fooled again by gurus
+ The Bootstrap Challenge – Walking the Talk

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

Why Being a Deal Maker Matters To Your Team

We continue to find more and more fantastic podcasts available online. One inspiring podcast worth checking out is available from the Stanford E-corner website.

Kauffman Foundation Senior Fellow, Ted Zoller in a recent presentation talks about “seizing opportunities and the pathways to developing an entrepreneurial career”. It is worth a listen if you have the time.

The podcast describes many fantastic ideas about approaching and developing your entrepreneurial spirit. One element that stood out was the concept of the ‘deal maker’. There are entrepreneurs (or innovators) and investors. Deal makers act as brokers to make things happen.

So where do you fit? Are you an entrepreneur, investor or deal maker? Do you have characteristics of all three?

Importantly you should acknowledge your strengths and consider your ability as a deal maker. Are you sitting on a great idea or prototype but cannot drive it forward? Have you made some bad deals that mean you cannot move your business in the right direction? If you are stuck, you may need to buddy up with a deal maker or improve your deal making skills.

This makes more sense when you consider your team (assuming you have people around you). The common theme seasoned or serial entrepreneurs tend to mention is team work. They needed individuals with different skills and mindsets to drive their concepts forward.

In the March 2012 edition of the Harvard Business Review, an article on Teamwork titles ‘To Drive Creativity, Add Some Conformity’ looks at the optimal team balance.

They outline the optimal balance as below:

Creatives (20-30%) – Source of radical innovation.
Detail-Oriented People (Up to 10%) – May strengthen functions (such as budgetary control).
Conformists (10-20%) – Supports creatives by boosting cooperation and confidence.

While recruiting and building a team may not suit all, the important things to consider here are your skills versus the skills you may need to move your business upwards.

What categories do you think you fit into and where do you need further development or assistance?

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You might also enjoy:
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ Lessons Learned From A Hacker News Traffic Spike
+ Startup Weekend: What to expect? How to prepare?

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

Project Mackerel – Please Sir… Complete our quick survey?

Work continues on Project Mackerel, our planned online portal to help job seekers impress in interviews. It even may help bright eyed entrepreneurs like you during a sales pitch to a potential investor.

We are calling out to everyone to fill out our quick survey. We essentially want to know if anyone would use our proposed service. The survey is available via the link below:

Click here to take survey (Link will open in a new window)

Share the link or embed within your blog or website:

<a href=”http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/753VK7N”>Click here to take a quick survey on proposed job seekers website</a>

We know that getting responses can be extremely slow and challenging but we are hoping you guys can spread the word. As always, we will keep you informed on the process and share our experiences.

Thanks all!

——-

Check out these earlier posts on the project:

Project Mackerel – Sneek Peek of Prototype
Project Mackerel – Calling all Beta Testers
Project Mackerel – Calling all Beta Testers (Follow Up)

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You might also enjoy:
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ Startup Myths – I shall not be fooled again by gurus
+ The Bootstrap Challenge – Walking the Talk

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

Upcoming Posts – Please Vote

Over the past few months we have been busy hammering away on our typewriters. Some articles we have published. Others have sat idle on our desks waiting for our head editor to review. To help us – please vote for articles you would like to see published.

Reply via WordPress, tweet us (@SparkNLaunch), text us or even let us know via smoke signal. Just include the post number in your message. Have we missed something? Then send us your suggestions.

Here is a list of our planned future posts….

Upcoming posts:

1. Would you buy it? – Examining the most powerful test for any new idea or product by asking the simple question of “Would you buy it?”.

2. The Lean Startup – A summary of the lean movement and our impressions on its effectiveness in the current entrepreneur climate.

3. Minimum Viable Product (MVP) – Describing the shift from product to customer development models and the importance of getting something out to the market sooner, rather than later/never. You may have nothing to lose by exposing your product today.

4. The Five Whys? (Why 5x) – Testing the ‘five whys’ approach to root cause analysis. A Taiichi Ohno (Toyota) approach to lean manufacturing now being advocated by Lean Startup author Eric Ries.

5. Project Trout meets Adwords – Our ongoing investigation into social media and the success (or rather failure) in driving traffic continues. This time we share our unsurprising results on using Google AdWords.

6. Margin Call – We try and apply lessons from the film Margin Call to the startup industry.

7. Million Dollar Viral – Research into the power of viral marketing and whether such techniques can be repeated. Can these methods be used by a small startup or are they reserved for the big boys?

8. Front Page News (Media Coverage) – We explore the steps required to make it onto the front page of Tech Crunch or Hacker News, and what this really means to the longevity of your company.

9. Market Research Monkey – Some musings on the challenges in conducting market research.

10. Using Buzzwords Badly – A closer look at the use of buzzwords and jargon, and if the misuse of words even matters.

11. Why your online presence is meaningless! – A rambling entry on why your online presence is not enough to progress your business.

12. Why Google+ Sux? – Sharing the frustration and joy of Google. We put forward an argument that Google has too many engineers building products that the average consumer cannot use.

13. Everything has been done – Success may take years and why all your ideas are already being delivered and rejected by the market.

14. Why being a deal maker matters! – A look at the important players that can make a successful startup.

15. Five Dollar Millionaire – Why $5 is suddenly a popular price point for your startup product. A couple examples on how psychological price points are being exploited by entrepreneurs.

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You might also enjoy:
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ Startup Myths – I shall not be fooled again by gurus
+ The Bootstrap Challenge – Walking the Talk

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

The Apprentice – Lean Startup Builds Minimum Viable Product in Two Days?

The Apprentice is often critised for its inaccurate portrayal of business. And rightly so – a boardroom full of ‘business’ candidates with no real ‘business’ skills and too much ego.

The willing contestants manage to mess up the simplest of tasks. Every season seems to get worse and worse. Surely by now applicants to this public process know what to expect. Knowing how to operate a calculator must be made a minimum selection criteria.

On a recent episode of the UK Apprentice one candidate managed to fall asleep (unprofessional but acceptable given her colleagues inability to make a decision) and her entire team failed to perform a basic pricing exercise (knowing how much you are selling your product is important in a pitch).

This TV show, along with Dragons Den and others falls firmly into the reality entertainment bucket. With all the entrepreneurial buzz around sadly we deserve better than this?

However should we be appreciating the lean approach to product development? Participants brainstorm and bring a product to market within an episode. The winners land the most sales from the general public or major retailer. Pretty impressive for a two day startup?

An idea is pitched to a focus group for feedback. Of course teams totally ignore the wisdom of the customer and enevatible deliver a product only they think is brilliant.

Sure, plenty of things are handed to the teams – like a meeting with several of the largest retailers and access to top designers who can spit out a prototype overnight. How is this different to an incubator?

A Minimum Viable Product has just those features that allow the product to be deployed, and no more. The product is typically deployed to a subset of possible customers, such as early adopters that are thought to be more forgiving, more likely to give feedback, and able to grasp a product vision from an early prototype or marketing information. (Source: Wikipedia)

For more definitions and explanations check out our Startup Lingo Glossary.

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You might also enjoy:
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ Startup Myths – I shall not be fooled again by gurus
+ The Bootstrap Challenge – Walking the Talk

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

April Fools Day – Some of Our Favourites

Happy April Fools Day! We hope you didn’t get caught out by any of today’s shenanigans. If you did, maybe set a diary reminder for next year?

There were some great entries this year as major brands got involved. Ikea, Google, The Economist, Microsoft Kinect, BMV, Mini, Virgin, Sainsbury, The Independent, Innocent Smoothie, Marmite, Walkers, The Daily Mail… plus many more had a go.

We enjoyed Ikea’s allen key recall and Google’s proposed Gmail Tap. Which ones did you enjoy? Please share!

For more check out the following two handy summaries:

April Fools Day Round-Up 2012 (The Poke)
April Fools’ Day roundup: the big toys, the small toys and the cats (Engadget)

If you like dates and numbers you can always check our these two earlier posts:

Leap Year – 3 interesting facts about 29 February
It’s a numbers game – 11/11/11 @ 11:11:11

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You might also enjoy:
+ Friday 13th – 3 interesting facts
+ It’s a numbers game – 11/11/11 @ 11:11:11
+ Happy New Years – Bring on 2012!
+ Social Media Experiment – Twitter, Google+ and now Facebook

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

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