Archive | May 2012

Ghetto Testing the Viability of an Idea

Idea validation – the writings on the wall…

Back in 2009 Mark Pincus (CEO and Founder of gaming company Zynga) spoke to Stanford University students about the concept of “ghetto testing”.

What is ghetto testing?

Ghetto Testing or Dry Testing is a way to “estimate your sales opportunities in your target market before actually investing to build the product. The key idea is to find out how it will sell by pretending to a relatively small group of your target audience that it is already available.” Pincus explains “before spending tremendous resources to build out an idea, the company first tests the viability of an idea.”

Simply you create a method to test your product idea, without actually building the product. This reflects the lean startup roots of customer development and the path towards a minimum viable product.

How do I implement it?

In the Stanford Podcast Pincus describes the steps, summarised below.

+ Someone in the organisation tells him about a new idea for a game.
+ No code is written.
+ They tell the marketing or product manager that the product is built. Describe it in five words.
+ The five words are posted to the website, made live for five minutes.
For example they put up a link – “Hey, do you ever fantasize about running your own x?”
+ Based on results of the immediate testing, they spend a week constructing a basic product (“ghetto build“).
+ They A/B test it and flow test it. They put it out to 1%, 10% of our users.
+ They build a data warehouse with the testing platform.
+ Based on results they either roll out the improved version, make changes or stop development.

Fortunately Zynga have the luxury of a massive user base and traffic flow. Therefore for new businesses it may be more challenging to get instant feedback within 5 minutes. However this example provides a simple illustration of evaluating your idea without writing a line of code.

The test doesn’t need to be online. It may be a poster on a bulletin board asking interested people to call, text or email you. It may be a small advert in the local newspaper. It could be cold calling prospective customers and asking if they would be interested in your product. Early feedback may help you proceed, pivot or bin your idea.

Why is it important?

Determining if your business or product idea is viable is an early challenge for an entrepreneur. Mocking up a quick test to execute provides quick feedback giving you the direction to stop or continue.

Did this post help? Drop us a line with your testing experiences.

——

A/B Testing:

A/B testing, split testing or bucket testing is a method of marketing testing by which a baseline control sample is compared to a variety of single-variable test samples in order to improve response or conversion rates. A classic direct mail tactic, this method has been recently adopted within the interactive space to test tactics such as banner ads, emails, landing pages or even entire websites. For instance, on an e-commerce website the purchase funnel is typically a good candidate for A/B testing, as even marginal improvements in drop-off rates can represent a lot of additional sales. (Source: Wikipedia)

Image Credit:
Drawgraffitiart

.

You might also enjoy:
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ Startup Myths – I shall not be fooled again by gurus
+ The Bootstrap Challenge – Walking the Talk

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

Technology – Is a black pixel on or off?

Bright Lights (Tech Radar)

[Note: This post is random post about Light Emitting Diode (LED). For more startup related messages, visit our main site.]

In a recent Techzing Podcast the guys spoke about the deceptively inefficient Yelp rating system. On a unrelated topic they briefly raised the question: is a black pixel on or off?

The curiosity got the better of us and we spent some time googling the answer. In summary LED turn the pixel off to display black. However in older display technology, the answer differs. We share the results below.

Pre-Flat – Blocks Light:

In the world before flat screens, screens had a big flat light at the back that was always on.

“If a pixel wanted to show you white it lets all the light through. If it wants to show you black it blocks all the light. Either way, the light behind is still on and still consuming the same power.”

(Source: Steve Mould)

LCD – Blocks Light:

“Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) pixels do not produce there own light. If the pixels are off, they don’t let the backlight through, when they are on, they let the backlight through.”

(Source: About.Com)

AMOLED – Turns Off:

To display black, AMOLED (active-matrix organic light-emitting diode) turns off the pixel. As a result you can save your battery by displaying black.

(Source: Wikipedia)

For more information you can visit the Nokia Developer site for their study on how color makes a difference.

Steve Mould test the hypothesis with some impressive calculations. His post How much phone battery can you save by switching to dark wallpapers and themes? provides an insight into extending the life of your phone battery.

We are not scientists, so drop us a line if we have mixed up the facts!

.

You might also enjoy:
+ April Fools Day – Some of Our Favourites
+ Friday 13th – 3 interesting facts
+ Happy New Years – Bring on 2012!

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

Need Startup Advice? – Just Ask Online

Expert Knowledge is The Next Big Thing

We are big fans of online expert sites. Quora, Askolo, Stack Exchange and many more are all part of a trend towards matching experts to inquisitive minds. These platforms are essentially allowing subject matter experts to sell their knowledge to others. Why not?

A Great Resource For Finding Expert Answers

One our favourite expert portals is Sporuter. It is a fantastic resource for “Expert Answers for Your Startup Questions”. It gives you direct access to startup gurus like Eric Ries, Dan Martell, Hiten Shah, Ash Maurya. The list of valuable contributors goes on and on.

Sharing Some Invaluable Answers

We thought we would share some of the gems we have found. This is only a handful. Check out more at Sporuter. Drop us a line and share your favourities!


Eric Ries (Entrepreneur, author of The Lean Startup):

Q. There has been some talk lately that MVPs are coming out that are not quite up to even MVP standards. How do you set the bar for an MVP?

A. MVP is all about what you’re trying to learn. If it tests your hypothesis, do it. But don’t go talking to the press about it, that’s way too soon.


Joe Stump (Founder):

Q. In what areas have you failed in your business? What lessons did you learn from them? How did they create more opportunities and insights for you?

I’d say the top two things that caused major issues at SimpleGeo early on was growing the team too quickly and attempting to solve too many of our customers’ problems at once…


Dan Martell (Founder and Angel Investor):

Q. What is the best place to look for people to work with on a startup idea? startup meetups? the one’s I’ve been to seem to be all about “networking”, but when it comes to actually doing real work people seem to be reluctant.

A. Founder Dating, Startup Weekend, Technical User Groups and Meetups. If you create an online brand using Twitter / Blog /etc and tweet at people – you’ll eventually make friends with them over the internet.


Ash Maurya (Entrepreneur, Foodie, Dad):

Q. While my company is in stealth mode, what is the best way to recruit your first group of “testers” to help you test your product?

A. I have a problem with stealth-mode. What are you hiding from?

.

You might also enjoy:
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ Startup Myths – I shall not be fooled again by gurus
+ The Bootstrap Challenge – Walking the Talk

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

How the $16bn Facebook IPO looks like in cash (Image)

Mark insisted on paying in cash… (Image Hack: demonocracy.info)


()

Facebook are on the verge of making history. Their IPO will see them raise at least $16 billion and value the company at over $100 billion.

The Economic Times reports:

Facebook’s initial public offering of stock is shaping up to be one of the largest ever. The world’s definitive online social network is raising at least $16 billion, a big windfall for a company that began eight years ago with no way to make money.

Facebook priced its IPO at $38 per share on Thursday, at the high end of its expected range. If extra shares reserved to cover additional demand are sold as part of the transaction, Facebook Inc. and its early investors stand to reap as much as $18.4 billion from the IPO.

The IPO values the company at around $104 billion, slightly more than Amazon.com, and well above well-known corporations such as Disney and Kraft.

Those are some really unfathomable numbers! To put the figures into some perspective, imagine a pallet stacked full of fresh $100 notes:

+ 100 million dollars ($100,000.000) = 1 pallet (approx shoulder height)
+ 1 billion dollars ($1,000,000,000) = 10 pallets
+ 2 billion dollars ($2,000,000,000) = 20 pallets (1 truck)
+ 16 billion dollars ($16,000,000,000) = 160 pallets (8 trucks – 1 x image above)
+ 100 billion dollars ($100,000,000,000) = 1,000 pallets (50 trucks – 6.25 x image above)
+ 104 billion dollars ($104,000,000,000) = 1,040 pallets (52 trucks – 6.50 x image above)

Whatever you think about Facebook, Zuckerberg, the bubble, this IPO represents a truly impressive story and no one can be certain what direction the share price will head on float day.

Image credit: Demonocracy.Info (Truck Image)

.

You might also enjoy:
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ Startup Weekend: What to expect? How to prepare?
+ Samsung’s Pivot From Dried Fish to Smartphones

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

To Code or Not To Code

“John celebrated his ‘Hello World’ code!”


()

“To be, or not to be, that is the question…” eloquently wrote William Shakespeare in the opening phrase of Hamlet. Nowadays “to code, or not to code” is the hot question filling up discussion boards and Friday night technology meetups. The ongoing discussion touches on the level of coding required to be involved in a startup and whether one should even bother putting in the time to learn. Note when we say ‘coding’, we are referring to any programming/development activities that involve typing and executing code.

This week alone numerous posts filled up the frontpage of Hacker News. Articles promoting coding were quickly followed by articles discouraging coding. Coders, hackers and non-coders fought over the virtues of learning code and the very discussion proved the point of how varied the opinion is on the matter. For every failed non-coder tale there was a story of a successful one.

While some argue that it is a prerequisite for any founder to know and understand code, others cite the many non-technical founders quite happy to sit at the top of a organisation letting experts develop their product. There just doesn’t appear to be a ‘black and white’ answer to the question. This may well hint that a successful startup is not built on code alone, but the things around it.

Some thoughts on learning to code:

+ Understanding: You don’t need to be an expert but understanding code and the technology helps in making informed decisions about your product and platform. Sure you can defer to your CTO however it surely must pay to know a little bit on a topic than nothing at all. And especially when you don’t have or cannot afford a CTO.

+ Measurement: The level of coding knowledge is difficult to measure and is not always comparable. Someone may know everything about one language and nothing about another. Someone may understand the mechanics of coding but not know any specific language at all. How much one learns may not be easily measured, compared or applied.

+ Diversity: So you want to start coding – okay which language? HTML/CSS/JS/PHP/Ruby/Python/Flash… Then there is further division between front end and back end, and what flavour of language. Plain old vanilla ‘JavaScript’ or new style ‘CoffeeScript’. Sure there are similarities and fundamentals you can pick up, but even once you select a language there are still divisions.

+ Time/Focus: When you are in the rush of starting a business there is so much to learn. You have customers to go speak to and put out fires. Do you have the time and focus to start learning and fixing code? Some argue the importance of focusing on your skills and outsourcing your gaps. Eventually you will need to handover the code to an expert. Maybe it is a benefit to employ a professional coder sooner rather than later, allowing you more time to focus on selling/marketing etc.

Our personal experience is that to be taken seriously by many developers and other startup folk, showing you have made any effort to learn code is well received. You don’t need to be an expert but certainly being able to write something down and show off a prototype is a respectable achievement. However we do feel that a careful balance is needed to ensure that focus is given in the right places to ensure that you are not just left with a great code, but a great business.

Want more, check out some other views on learning to code:
Please Learn to Code
Please Don’t Lean to Code
Why I Desperately Needed to Learn To Code
Please Don’t Become Anything, Especially Not A Programmer
Please Learn to Write

Image Credit: uBelly

More Spark n Launch.

.

You might also enjoy:
+ Lessons Learned From A Hacker News Traffic Spike
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ The Bootstrap Challenge – Walking the Talk
+ Startup Weekend: What to expect? How to prepare?

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

New Startup Lingo – More Buzzwords

A few months ago we launched our very own startup glossary to help others learn the lingo. We collated a list of some of the commonly used buzz words being used in the community. We are now planning to expand the list – so please tell us what you would like added.

We are working to add these (plus more):

A/B Testing
Crowdfunding
Early Adopter
Freemium
Funding
Horizontal
Human Capital
Hyperlocal
Long Tail
Low Hanging Fruit
Minimum Viable Product (MVP)
Monetise
Seed Money
Sweat Equity
Startup
Stealth
Social Media
Stack
Traction
Vertical
Web 2.0

The current glossary includes:

Agile
Angel
Burn Rate
Bootstrap
Business Plan
Business Model
Customer Development Model
Disruption
Elevator Pitch
Entrepreneur
Equity
Incubator
Intraprenuer
Lean Startup
Non Disclosure Agreement (NDA)
Pivot
Venture Capital (VC)

If you cannot wait for our list to be updated, check out Forbes and their Startup Infographic.

.

You might also enjoy:
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ Startup Myths – I shall not be fooled again by gurus
+ The Bootstrap Challenge – Walking the Talk

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

A Smart Bear – Jason Cohen on Startups

Bear riding a bicycle launches startup

()

We have just finished listening to an interview with Jason Cohen on Techzing. We first heard Jason on an interview on The Startup Success Podcast. Jason writes a very popular startup blog , is a successful entrepreneur and founder of four successful companies.

We really enjoyed listening to his views on startups and his real world experience from building his own businesses. There is so much information on startup methodologies however Jason talks in terms of actually applying these concepts. His insightful views challenge many of the norms providing common sense steps to getting your startup off the ground. You can find out more from Jason at his blog and podcast.

Below are some key points from the Techzing podcast. We thought that the ‘sell it first, build it second’ approach really smart.

+ Exponential growth – You can aim for exponential growth but understand that growth will be slow and flat in the beginning due to small starting base.

+ Blogging – Jason tried to conform to blogging best practice and rules but eventually found honest writing works better (proof with his 30k+ RSS subscribers). He wrote better and gained more followers when not worrying about the guidelines.

+ Startup Philosophy – Startup entrepreneurs talk to others in terms of therapy rather than philosophy.

+ Selling Your Startup – It is a difficult decision whether to sell your business. It is not a bad thing to question why you want to sell?

+ Growing Your Startup – Again, it is a difficult decision on how to grow your business. You can chose to grow without employing more people.

+ Evaluating Your Idea or Sell It First, Build It Second

Jason suggests you continue to talk to customers every 3 months to benefit from their insights into your product. He advocates the strength of customer interviews before even building your product.

Approach – Customer Discovery:
Write down your theories and assumptions (20 to 30).
Speak to customers.
Write customer attitudes and your own thoughts down.
Don’t try convince customer, get customer to validate or invalidate theories.
Don’t lead the witness – ask open ended questions to get the truth.
Result will likely be the following validations: Third right, third wrong, third appears while talking.
Pick the top 5 and build your product.

Key Questions:
Would you buy it? How much would you pay? Would you write a cheque today?
If you cannot see a clear niche and interest emerging then likely product will not sell.

Example:
Jason spoke 50 people (1 hour per interview) – 30 said they would buy the product, 20 actually paid.
He asked the question – Would you write a cheque today?
This approach is not a sales call but asking the questions to get real answers.
The benefit are you can get customers paying before building a product. This is the best signal of validation you can get!

This bootstrapping sales technique allows you to have income on day 1 and aids funding implementation.

+ Finding Potential Customers To Interview – Jason recommended this great cold calling technique.

Begin by searching for experts (who are likely to be your potential customers) on LinkedIn. Be sure to approach these experts honestly, openly, respectful, and be willing to pay for their time. Do not approach this as a sales call but rather a call for help.

In Jason’s experience he found that all people approached were willing to help and for free. If you cannot find people to cold call, this suggests product is going to be difficult to sell.

+ The Business Guy – Jason believes that business guys don’t exist. Business starts by getting leads and getting real things done. They doesn’t wait for development and don’t waste time with things that won’t generate sales.

+ Pricing – backup example: people willing to pay whatever cost when their server crashes

Benefits of paying for sales – mechanical process which you can control. good position to be in.
Blog followers don’t equal conversions – 2 signups from a blog post (30k) and similar result for KISSmetrics

+ Bootstrapping – Jason used early funding from friends and co-founders to build a profitable startup. He demonstrated that company could make money while asking for money. By the time Jason needed some more serious money he found funding from strategic investors easier by showcasing a proven model.

+ Happiness – Doing something that fulfills you leads to happiness. Jason gets great satisfaction from helping others (knowing that others can succeed from mentoring discussions). Discussion often leads to eliciting new ideas.

Conclusion
+ Sell it first, build it second
+ Be honest when cold calling to elicit true customer insight (early sales are incidental but essential)
+ Build a proven model to help raising more funds
+ Doing something fulfilling leads to happiness

Did you listen to the podcast? What did you think? Share your thoughts in the comments section below!

.

You might also enjoy:
+ Startup Weekend: What to expect? How to prepare?
+ Samsung’s Pivot From Dried Fish to Smartphones
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ The Bootstrap Challenge – Walking the Talk

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

Social Media Experiment – Twitter, Google+ and now Facebook

Like it or hate it?

Through Project Trout we have been sharing our social media experiences. We have spoken about the effectiveness of tools in attracting visitors and building meaningful relationships in earlier posts.

We are already using Twitter and Google Plus. We have not had the best levels of engagement however we are hoping over time these will be useful platforms to have a presence on.

We have now signed up to Facebook. We had reluctance in signing up to yet another social media site however it may be an interesting study to determine if FB is any better at drawing in visitors than Twitter and Google Plus. So far we have not had the greatest success with any other tools. Let’s wait and see what happens.

Stay tuned and check us out on Facebook!

.

You might also enjoy:
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ Startup Myths – I shall not be fooled again by gurus
+ The Bootstrap Challenge – Walking the Talk

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

Blog Milestone – Lessons Learned From 50 Blog Posts

One way to celebrate your 50th blog post... (Dangerous Goods Transport)

()

It’s been a long time since we celebrated our 30th blog post and even longer since our first post when we proudly blogged “Hello World”.

Today we publish our 50th post! We are often surprised how many bloggers suffer the dreaded writers block. We suffer the opposite and have a pipeline of 100+ draft posts awaiting publication.

We have learned a massive amount on startups since beginning this blog. Mostly thanks to the excellent resources available online and meeting some smart people around the place. Nevertheless there is still much more to learn in this dynamic environment.

So, what have we learned? Was it worth it? Should we keep going? Where are we? And where are we going?

On startups:
+ Startups are hard work
+ Startups are uncertain
+ Startups are different to traditional businesses
+ Your startup will probably fail

On people:
+ Your team matters
+ You don’t need to be technical (but it helps)
+ You need enthusiasm and passion
+ Be surrounded by people smarter than you
+ Don’t work in isolation, engage with others

On ideas:
+ Every good or bad idea is being done
+ Having an idea is just the beginning
+ Evaluating your idea is tough but crucial
+ You need to identify the problem
+ Getting surveys filled out is hard
+ Personal evaluation is step 1

On planning:
+ Planning is important
+ The Business Plan has been replaced by The Business Model

On customers:
+ Customer discovery starts by getting out the building and speak to people
+ You need to speak to potential customers
+ You need to know their pain points
+ You want the right customers, not the wrong ones

On development:
+ You need an MVP
+ Build it and they will come is fiction
+ Keep It Simple

On learning:
+ Entrepreneurs are willing to share their stories
+ The Internet has many great resources
+ Knowing the language helps
+ Reflection counts
+ You can never stop learning

On motivation:
+ Stop making excuses
+ Set small tasks and complete them

On blogging:
+ Getting engagement is hard
+ Upcoming posts
+ No one reads this blog, but it doesn’t matter
+ Twitter doesn’t work
+ Good writing counts
+ Looks don’t matter

On next steps:
+ Keep blogging, but write better more meaningful and honest posts
+ Start (and finish) something real
+ Interact more

Thanks to all our readers and those who have sent us feedback. We look forward to sharing another 50 posts with all of you!

.

You might also enjoy:
+ Lessons Learned From A Hacker News Traffic Spike
+ Startup Weekend: What to expect? How to prepare?
+ Samsung’s Pivot From Dried Fish to Smartphones
+ April Fools Day – Some of Our Favourites

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

14 Year Old Girl: “Stop making excuses, make something awesome”

The Good Old Days? (Scitech Blog News)

The old and dusty cliched image of technology has radically shifted in the past decade. The tech scene is now glamorised by young people trying to build the next Facebook.

When we came across the article title – I’m a girl, aged 14, based in the North – working on a tech startup; “stop making excuses, make something awesome” – we suddenly felt very old.

Cec Plascott along with two others have built Propelly. The sales pitch of “digital retail, minus the hassle” sums up a neat little platform for selling anything digital lying around on your desktop. It is a fantastic idea that has been brought to fruition by a group of teenagers.

Plascott passionately writes about telling her teenage counterparts to stop making excuses and do something. Her message applies not just to youngsters, but adults who are sitting back and doing nothing. If a 14 year old can build something, then any adult has no excuse.

She lists a handful of other teens who have gone out and built stuff – Nick D’Aloisio, Jamal Edwards, and Josh Buckley. She cites the GoSquared story that started out by the team when they were still at school. There are many more.

Age is not the only issue tackled. Plascott also praises female entrepreneurs like Leah Busque and Deena Varshavskaya for inspiring her. While women continue to lag behind in the startup communities, the few female entrepreneurs around the place are making a difference (one example: Caterina Fake).

So next time you are looking for an excuse, consider the young kid next to you on the train who is heading home to finish their homework and then finalise their business plan…

“Stop making excuses, make something awesome.”

.

You might also enjoy:
+ Lessons Learned From A Hacker News Traffic Spike
+ Startup Weekend: What to expect? How to prepare?
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ The Bootstrap Challenge – Walking the Talk

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

New Month, New Look – What Do You Think?

After several months we have finally decided to change our WordPress theme. We are now running Origin. This was to replace the Bueno theme that we found difficult to read. We are hoping the new minimalist look and feel will improve general readability and enjoyment!

What do you think? Please let us know.

We wrote about the power of keeping website design simple in an earlier post – Keep It Simple Stupid (KISS) – Ugly Websites That Went Viral. We will report back if keeping it simple makes any difference to our blog.

.

You might also enjoy:
+ Social Media Experiment – Twitter, Google+ and now Facebook
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ Startup Myths – I shall not be fooled again by gurus

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

%d bloggers like this: