Tag Archive | customer

Thinking of Starting a Startup? 8 Sentiments To Think About

Startups for the Rest of Us

Mike Taber and Rob Walling record an awesome regular podcast called “Startups for the Rest of Us“. It’s aimed at helping developers, designers and entrepreneurs launch their startup product. They have just hit their 100th episode and you can check out older recordings or episode transcripts on their website.

In episode 98 they share “eight sentiments that do not bode well for your startup”.

The Eight Sentiments

1. “This product idea is awesome. Now off to the basement to build it; see you in 6 months!”

2. “I haven’t even finished the features I want to build yet and potential customers are already asking me to build X.” Translation: “I’m sticking to my product idea no matter what my potential customers tell me.”

3. “I’m halfway done with this idea… but that shiny new one over there seems so much better.”

4. “I plan to quite my job 60 days after I launch.”

5. “It would take me as much time to explain this task to someone else, so I’ll just do it myself.”

6. “I don’t want to bother with all that click through and conversion rate nonsense…I’ll just build a great product.” Translation: “Build a better mousetrap is not a good strategy”

7. “My idea is pretty hard to explain, do you have 20 minutes to spare?”

8. “I don’t want to talk publicly about my idea because someone might steal it.”

Summary

These are excellent points. The message is do not keep your idea a secret. Speak to people, especially customers and listen and apply their feedback. You need to be able to articulate your idea clearly and be open to suggestions. Do not build and ship in isolation!

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You might also enjoy:
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ Startup Myths – I shall not be fooled again by gurus
+ Startup Weekend: How to prepare? (Day 0)

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The History of Lean Startup by Steve Blank

lean startup customer development steve blak feedback loop

tl;dr Steve Blank tells the story how lack of startup framework led him to design customer development, and his pupil Eric Ries went on to build Lean Startup. The Lean Launchpad classes offer entrepreneurs an opportunity to learn how to apply customer development and lean startup concepts to testing and building their business ideas.

The History of Lean Startup

Steve Blank is a Silicon Valley-based retired serial entrepreneur who now spends his time teaching entrepreneurship to students. His early writings on customer development (The Four Steps to the Epiphany) have evolved into the Lean Launchpad. The Lean Launchpad provides entrepenuers with an online, interactive envrionment to learn all that is needed to understand and apply the lean startup methodologies.

In Blank’s most recent blog post he reiterates his discovery and journey.

The Journey

Blank tells the story how lack of startup framework led him to design customer development, and his pupil Eric Ries went on to build lean startup. They found that the traditional business tools did not apply to startups.

+ Startups are different – Ten years ago he started thinking about why startups are different from existing companies. He questioned: Are business plans suitable for startups? Is execution all that matters?

+ Business models first, business plans later – Blank thought that startups needed business models before business plans. This lead him to come up with “customer development” – the formal methodology to search for a business model.

+ Business models before execution – He believed that Customer Development needed traditional product management. This process is documented in Blank’s book, Four Steps to the Epiphany.

+ Lean Startup and Eric Ries – In 2003 Blank was approached to teach a class in Customer Development at Haas Business School. He insisted that Eric Ries be in the class. (Blank had an investment in Ries’s IMVU business.) Ries argued that the traditional product management and waterfall development should be replaced by agile development. This approach was named “Lean Startup”.

+ Standardising the Business Model – Until now the structure of the business model remained vague. However Alexander Osterwalder wrote Business Model Generation that allowed entrepreneurs to build an operating plan around their search for a business. The business model canvas simplified the planning process and pressed entrepreneurs for real answers to tough questions.

+ Testing the theory – The startup methodology remained scientific theory until the National Science Foundation approached Blank to teach the concepts to a group of scientists. They wanted to apply the theory to commercialising their basic research. This triggered the rollout of the Lean Launchpad course. Now real entrepreneurs are applying the theory to real startup scenarios.

Conclusion

Blank has turned building a startup into a science. His publications and theories have encouraged many entrepreneurs to think more about their business before leaping into the abyss. While some may argue entrepreneurship is not a science that can be taught, the Lean Launchpad provides an intelligent framework for those looking for some direction and stability in their search for the next big business.

Links:
+ Startup Is Not The Same As A New Start Business
+ Extracts from The Four Steps to the Epiphany (pdf)

Image Credit: The Lean Startup

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You might also enjoy:
+ The Startup Dictionary – Learning the Lingo #3
+ Learning From Other Startups – 6 Real Life Stories
+ Startup Myths – I shall not be fooled again by gurus
+ The Bootstrap Challenge – Walking the Talk

Welcome new readers! If this is your first time here, you might want to start with a new article or read through our older submissions.

Where to next? Check out a random article.

Stay in touch: Check us out via RSS Feed, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.

Join the conversation: Leave a comment or this post.

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